HUGE NEWS! Alzheimer’s Reversed for the First Time

In the past decade hundreds of clinical trials, at an aggregate cost of over one billion dollars, have been conducted to find the ONE cure for Alzheimer’s Disease. But they all came up empty.

It turns out that there is a cure for early Alzheimer’s – but it’s not one particular drug or toodling with one specific gene. In fact, it’s not ONE thing at all.

In a small joint study, scientists from UCLA Mary S. Easton Center for Alzheimer’s Disease Research and the Buck Institute for Research on Aging found that memory loss may be reversed, and improvement sustained, using a lifestyle program that involves comprehensive changes in diet, brain stimulation, exercise, meditation, supplements and multiple additional steps that affect brain chemistry.

Sounds almost exactly like the program I developed for myself in 2004 when evidence of my mental decline became progressively worse. My symptoms were very much like the early part of Alzheimer’s Disease that had claimed my mother ten years before: I was making copious notes because my short term memory was fragile; I didn’t ask a question because I couldn’t remember if I had just asked it; and my tongue kept tripping on words, if I could even find the word.

Some of the ten participants in UCLA/Buck Institute’s study had symptoms similar to mine. For example, patient 3’s memory was so bad that she used an iPad to record everything, then forgot her password. Her children noticed she commonly lost her train of thought in mid-sentence, and often asked them if they had carried out the tasks that she mistakenly thought she had asked them to do.

The study was conducted by Dr. Dale Bredesen, UCLA’s Augustus Rose Professor of Neurology, director of the Easton Center and the paper’s author. Although other chronic illnesses such as heart disease, cancer and HIV have been improved through the use of combination therapies, this is the first time a clinical trial has been conducted for Alzheimer’s by combining a number of therapies.

Dr. Bredesen theorized that, rather than a single targeted agent, the solution might be a multiple-component system approach. “The existing Alzheimer’s drugs affect a single target, but Alzheimer’s Disease is more complex. Imagine having a roof with 36 holes in it, and your drug patched one hole very well,” he said. “The drug may have worked, and a single hole may have been fixed, but you still have 35 other leaks, and so the underlying process may not be affected much.” Dr. Bredesen added that although the findings are “very encouraging,” the results are largely anecdotal and a more extensive, controlled clinical trial is needed.

Of course, integrative functional medical practitioners have been combining diet and other lifestyle and healing techniques for decades to successfully reverse mild impairment associated with Alzheimer’s. They just did not have the necessary financing for clinical research studies.

In the UCLA/Buck Institute study, cognitive decline was reversed in nine of the ten participants. The patient who had been diagnosed with late stage Alzheimer’s did not improve.

The global burden of dementia is astounding, and on the rise. Alzheimer’s disease is now the third leading cause of death in the United States, after heart disease and cancer. There are currently 5.2 million Americans with AD, and 75 million young Americans with the most important genetic risk factor, APO-e4, the Alzheimer’s gene I inherited.

Cognitive decline can be reversed. In next month’s blog I’ll share with you 12 daily practices that have definitely helped me to regain my cognition and grow younger. In the study, none of the patients was able to stick to the entire protocol. Do I do all 12 of my practices every day? No, but some of them have become habits that I just do without thinking. It’s a New Year – consider beginning just three of these practices and notice the difference in your life.


12 Comments so far:
  •   January 8, 2017 - Joyce Says:

    Can’t wait to hear all 12 of the steps…..why do we have to wait? This is January, could we at least have the first one now? Pretty please? :^)

  •   January 8, 2017 - Maureen Says:

    This is so exciting!! I am definitely having memory lapses and I refuse to chalk it up to my age. I may be almost 82yr but that is just a number on a calendar. I echo Joyce and add my “Pretty please” to hers. 🙂

  •   January 8, 2017 - Ellen Wood Says:

    Good for you, Maureen! I just turned 80 and my memory is strong – actually, super strong compared to how it was in the late 90s. Here’s what I told Joyce: Okay, Joyce. Here goes: Once you’re familiar with the 12 steps, you may wonder why there is not one on gratitude. Be grateful is not included on the daily list because it is an integral part of every one of the habits, and is intended to permeate your body, mind and spirit throughout every day. The benefits are enormous when you practice each action step in an attitude of gratitude. So each night when you put down your book and unprop your bed pillows, think about what you’re grateful for and go to sleep smiling. Love to all.

  •   January 8, 2017 - Suzana Says:

    Can’ t wait either!’ This is great news, thank you for it!

  •   January 8, 2017 - Ellen Wood Says:

    Hi Suzana. Actually, there’s scientific evidence that meditation may prevent and even reverse cognitive decline so if you’re looking for a step with the most scientific evidence of its effectiveness, it’s definitely meditation. In the meantime, here’s what I told Joyce: Okay, Joyce. Here goes: Once you’re familiar with the 12 steps, you may wonder why there is not one on gratitude. Be grateful is not included on the daily list because it is an integral part of every one of the habits, and is intended to permeate your body, mind and spirit throughout every day. The benefits are enormous when you practice each action step in an attitude of gratitude. So each night when you put down your book and unprop your bed pillows, think about what you’re grateful for and go to sleep smiling.

  •   January 8, 2017 - Ellen Wood Says:

    Okay, Joyce. Here goes: Once you’re familiar with the 12 steps, you may wonder why there is not one on gratitude. Be grateful is not included on the daily list because it is an integral part of every one of the habits, and is intended to permeate your body, mind and spirit throughout every day. The benefits are enormous when you practice each action step in an attitude of gratitude. So each night when you put down your book and unprop your bed pillows, think about what you’re grateful for and go to sleep smiling. Love to all.

  •   January 9, 2017 - Donne'' Fregeau Says:

    You are truly a blessing to all who know you and those who don’t. You are a light to us all Ellen💞
    Thank You Thank You Thank You

    Donne’

  •   January 9, 2017 - Ellen Wood Says:

    WE are all a blessing to each other. I’m so grateful for our online community and the love that flows through all of us. BTW, there is a rare planetary alignment happening now until February 6. It’s a time for great opportunity for manifesting what would make you happy. read all about it:
    http://www.sun-gazing.com/rare-planetary-alignment-january-7-february-6-2017-planets-will-going-direct/

    also see this one – it talks about meditating during this time:
    http://www.disclose.tv/news/rare_alignment_on_jan_7thfeb_6_2017_all_planets_are_moving_direct/137229

  •   January 10, 2017 - Alan Conrad Says:

    I don’t apparently have any serious decline in mental facilities at 63 years old. I do however tend to forget some things quickly and at times I I draw a blank while talking and have to search for words. It seems the old grey matter is getting greyer. It concerns me and I’m quite interested in hearing about your lifestyle suggestions on how to reverse mental decline. Thank you for writing about this Ellen. You are inspiring!

  •   January 10, 2017 - Ellen Wood Says:

    Hi Alan. Thanks for your kind comments. Keep in mind that tending to forget and searching for words happens to all of us at every age. We just seem to pay more attention to it as we get older because of our fear of cognitive decline. Frequently tell yourself, “My mind is clear and sharp”.
    Love,
    Ellen

  •   January 20, 2017 - Annie Says:

    Hello Ellen,
    I’m so grateful to let me ( others)know about the hopeful news about Alzheimer.
    My mother died in 2007 when she was 82 years from Alzheimers disease.It was the most terrible period in my live.Still have to cry when I think what she had to go through.Thousands times I’ve thought ; give me your illness so that you can rest for a few hours …Those hallucinations ,fears,not knowing anymore who you are ,where you are ,who we were…it is a pain that cuts your heart in thousand peaces when you see a person suffer .
    My mother ,my brother and I , we all had to take crestor ( statins) for high cholesterol and we all 3 get diabetes type 2.
    My mother died from Alzheimer and me and my brother have rpoblems with our memory.
    I read that one of the side effects of statins (crestor)was type 2 diabetes.I would like to know if there could be a connection between dianetes type 2 and Alzheimer.
    Crestor should prevent stroke but I got a stroke in 2010.So statines didn’t help much.until now my arteries were ok. Awhole in the heart must have been the cause of the stroke. That is fixed and I got again TIA later.I always felt ill after taking statines so I stopped a few years ago. I feel much better no liverpain anymore,no musclepains anymore but in januay last year they diagnosed me with diabetes type 2. Since the I try to do everything to reverse my diabetes , changed diet (no/low carbs and healthy fats) and more exercise.I have to work on regular sleep schedule and meditation. I’m working on those 4 aspects and my brain is doing better. Diagnosis was mcognitive impairment after stroke but I believe that these live style changes really changed my foggy brain./bad memory. Okay it happens that I ask myself where did I park my car but
    not so often anymore.In the morning I do some qi gong.
    Personally when I look to my family history I see that negative issues /family problems played a big role in health.
    Sometimes a deep sadness can come up because I couldn’t make mother better.When their is no cure you could only ( but it is also everything)give love.I’m glad to have found Bruce Liptons course : ” the biology of believe” on Hay house.Not easy ( english not mother language) and not yet finished but it gives me hope !

  •   January 20, 2017 - Ellen Wood Says:

    Hi Annie. Thanks so much for writing. Re statins and Alzheimer’s: I’m not aware of a connection but there might be. What I do know if that some scientists are calling Alzheimer’s Diabetes Type 3!!! Keep working on diet, exercise, sleep and meditation – all excellent for your health and wellbeing. About asking yourself, “Where did I part the car?” That happens to people of all ages. My mind is often going likety split when I’m parking and I don’t pay attention. I have to consciously remind myself about where I’m parking. So that is not an indication of mental impairment. Sorry about your mother, dear Annie. My mother too died of Alzheimer’s but I know she’d be happy that she started me on this healthy path.
    Love and Blessings,
    Ellen

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